Brothers’ Keeper

This video says it all.

       There are times when I am overwhelmed with emotions witnessing acts of kindness, compassion, charity, and love given freely, unconditionally, to a total stranger.  There are many who spread their Light everywhere they go.  There’s Glen James, the homeless man who returned the backpack containing $42,000 .  Ethan Whittington, the man who set up the online fundraiser for Glen James.  He hoped to raise a few thousand dollars to give to Glen James to help him get on his feet.  Then there’s the people who donated money to the fundraiser for Glen James.   Someone offered to give him free dental care.  Another person offered a computer.

       One act of kindness by one man created a domino effect. There is an out-pour of love and compassion from you, wonderful human beings, for another member of the human race.

Let’s continue to help our neighbors, our brothers, our sisters.

Let’s continue to spread unity, love, compassion.

Let’s continue to be our brothers’ keeper.

Love, light and blessings

Meaning of Nursery Rhyme

an aerial view of a rowing crew in action.

Last night while playing with my little grandson. I began to sing “Row, Row, Row Your Boat.”

We sang it over and over before he went to bed.  Afterwards, I thought about the meaning of the lyrics.

“Row, row, row, your boat

Gently Down the stream.
Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily,
Life is but a dream.”

Could the boat represent one’s journey through life?  The rhyme seems to suggest that we should flow with life’s challenges.   I think it means, we should face the lessons from such challenges and navigate our lives gently in the face of struggles.  We should be positive and remember this life is an illusion.

Love, light and blessings

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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Meaning

The lyrics have often been used as a metaphor for life’s difficult choices, and many see the boat as referring to one’s self or a group with which one identifies.[2] Rowing is a skillful, if tedious, practice that takes perfection but also directs the vessel.[3] When sung as a group, the act of rowing becomes a unifier, as oars should be in sync for the progression of a rowboat. The idea that human beings travel along a certain stream [time] and suggests boundaries in the path of choices and in free will.[4] The third line recommends that challenges should be greeted in stride while open to joy with a smile.[5] Some have questioned the song’s implied necessity to row one’s boat downstream. This may in fact be a commentary on the paradoxical nature of time’s arrow with respect to man’s free will in a universe of materialistic causality.[6] The final line, “life is but a dream”, is perhaps the most meaningful. With a religious point of view, life and the physical plane may be regarded as having equivalent value as that of a dream, such that troubles are seen in the context of a lesser reality once one has awakened.[7]

Lewis Carroll, in his famous poem ending Through the Looking Glass used a variation of Row, Row, Row, Row Your Boat as the poem’s central theme:

A BOAT beneath a sunny sky,

Lingering onward dreamily

In an evening of July —

Children three that nestle near,

Eager eye and willing ear,

Pleased a simple tale to hear —

Long has paled that sunny sky:

Echoes fade and memories die:

Autumn frosts have slain July.

Still she haunts me, phantomwise,

Alice moving under skies

Never seen by waking eyes.

Children yet, the tale to hear,

Eager eye and willing ear,

Lovingly shall nestle near.

In a Wonderland they lie,

Dreaming as the days go by,

Dreaming as the summers die:

Ever drifting down the stream —

Lingering in the golden gleam —

Life, what is it but a dream?

Note: The first letter of each line in the poem spells out the full name, Alice Pleasance Liddell, the “real” Alice that was Carroll’s dreamchild muse, and inspiration.

Alice Walker

Save this on DeliciousAlice WalkerCourtesy of Wikipedia

EXPECT NOTHING

Expect nothing. Live frugally

On surprise.

become a stranger

To need of pity

Or, if compassion be freely

Given out

Take only enough

Stop short of urge to plead

Then purge away the need.

Wish for nothing larger

Than your own small heart

Or greater than a star;

Tame wild disappointment

With caress unmoved and cold

Make of it a parka

For your soul.

Discover the reason why

So tiny human midget

Exists at all

So scared unwise

But expect nothing. Live frugally

On surprise.

Alice Walker

Early life

Walker was born in Putnam County, Georgia,[3] the youngest of eight children, to Willie Lee Walker and Minnie Lou Tallulah Grant. Her father, who was, in her words, “wonderful at math but a terrible farmer,” earned only $300 ($4,000 in 2013 dollars) a year from sharecropping and dairy farming. Her mother supplemented the family income by working as a maid.[4] She worked 11 hours a day for USD $17 per week to help pay for Alice to attend college.[5]

Living under Jim Crow laws, Walker’s parents resisted landlords who expected the children of black sharecroppers to work the fields at a young age. A white plantation owner said to her that black people had “no need for education”. Minnie Lou Walker said, “You might have some black children somewhere, but they don’t live in this house. Don’t you ever come around here again talking about how my children don’t need to learn how to read and write.” Her mother enrolled Alice in first grade at the age of four.[6]

Growing up with an oral tradition, listening to stories from her grandfather (the model for the character of Mr. in The Color Purple), Walker began writing, very privately, when she was eight years old. “With my family, I had to hide things,” she said. “And I had to keep a lot in my mind.”[7]

In 1952, Walker was accidentally wounded in the right eye by a shot from a BB gun fired by one of her brothers.[8] In 2013, on BBC Radio’s Desert Island Discs, she said the act was actually deliberate but she agreed to protect her brother against their parents’ anger if they knew the truth. Because the family had no car, the Walkers could not take their daughter to a hospital for immediate treatment. By the time they reached a doctor a week later, she had become permanently blind in that eye. When a layer of scar tissue formed over her wounded eye, Alice became self-conscious and painfully shy. Stared at and sometimes taunted, she felt like an outcast and turned for solace to reading and to writing poetry. When she was 14, the scar tissue was removed. She later became valedictorian and was voted most-popular girl, as well as queen of her senior class, but she realized that her traumatic injury had some value: it allowed her to begin “really to see people and things, really to notice relationships and to learn to be patient enough to care about how they turned out”.[4]

After high school, Walker went to Spelman College in Atlanta on a full scholarship in 1961 and later transferred to Sarah Lawrence College near New York City, graduating in 1965. Walker became interested in the U.S. civil rights movement in part due to the influence of activist Howard Zinn, who was one of her professors at Spelman College. Continuing the activism that she participated in during her college years, Walker returned to the South where she became involved with voter registration drives, campaigns for welfare rights, and children’s programs in Mississippi.[9]

On March 17, 1967, she married Melvyn Roseman Leventhal. She worked as writer in residence at Jackson State College (1968–1969) and Tougaloo College (1970–1971) and was a black history consultant to the Friends of the Children of Mississippi Head Start program.

Selected works

Novels and short story collections

  • The Third Life of Grange Copeland (1970)
  • In Love and Trouble: Stories of Black Women (1973)
  • Meridian (1976)
  • The Color Purple (1982)
  • You Can’t Keep a Good Woman Down: Stories (1982)
  • To Hell With Dying (1988)
  • The Temple of My Familiar (1989)
  • Finding the Green Stone (1991)
  • Possessing the Secret of Joy (1992)
  • The Complete Stories (1994)
  • By The Light of My Father’s Smile (1998)
  • The Way Forward Is with a Broken Heart (2000)
  • Now Is The Time to Open Your Heart [a novel] (2004) Random House ISBN13 9781588363961
  • Everyday Use (1973). Short stories, essays, interviews

Poetry collections

  • Once (1968)
  • Revolutionary Petunias and Other Poems (1973)
  • Good Night, Willie Lee, I’ll See You in the Morning (1979)
  • Horses Make a Landscape Look More Beautiful (1985)
  • Her Blue Body Everything We Know: Earthling Poems (1991)
  • Absolute Trust in the Goodness of the Earth (2003)
  • A Poem Traveled Down My Arm: Poems And Drawings (2003)
  • Collected Poems (2005)
  • Hard Times Require Furious Dancing: New Poems

Non-fiction books

  • In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens: Womanist Prose (1983)
  • Living by the Word (1988)
  • Warrior Marks (1993)
  • The Same River Twice: Honoring the Difficult (1996)
  • Anything We Love Can Be Saved: A Writer’s Activism (1997)
  • Go Girl!: The Black Woman’s Book of Travel and Adventure (1997)
  • Pema Chodron and Alice Walker in Conversation (1999)
  • Sent By Earth: A Message from the Grandmother Spirit After the Bombing of the World Trade Center and Pentagon (2001)
  • We Are the Ones We Have Been Waiting For (2006)
  • Overcoming Speechlessness (2010)
  • Chicken Chronicles, A Memoir (2011)

Stepping into you!

This is a wonderful post about soul lessons.
Love, light and blessings

Healing Your Heart From Within

Throughout my life I have switched religious camps, this one, that one or none, but never closed my mind. Thankfully, after much heartfelt thought and a determination to understand, spirit (or God, or the universe), chose to have a chat with me. I now see my Truth. That in itself was my journey. I now pass this on within this site and my blog. It isn’t a be all or end all, it is just my journey. There are many,  many paths. Even the unbeliever of anything has their path. You cannot know love without hate, happiness without sadness, otherwise with what do you compare and be able to ‘know’ these things.

I can tell you to not put your hand in the fire because it will burn, and you will understand this. But the day that you actually do burn your hand…all changes…then you DO ‘know’ that truth for…

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Soul Lessons

Woman Sitting in MeditationI’m trying to hold it together today.  I’m navigating through murky waters.

I am remembering everything that I have studied and learned these past few years to help me to be in the present and balanced.  My ego is trying to create fear with thoughts of, what if this happens, or that happens?  I am reminding myself we all have lessons to learn.  I am reminding myself that I may help and guide but each of us is responsible for choices we make.  Choices we make shape our lives. The challenges we’re faced with are lessons to be learned for soul growth.  I’m standing on the side line offering love, prayers, and meditations to defuse the situation.

Meditation and connection with Spirit give me peace and hope.  I am grateful, I am grateful …

Love, light, and blessings

4D Astral Congestion, Noises, Images & More

I read this post by Denise LaFaye and it is on target with what some of the things I have experienced lately. In the article she talks about shifting realities. It is comforting to know I am not the only one having such experiences. This is a great article that may resonate with you.
Love, light, and blessings